Be trained!

Your guide to Oregon OSHA's safety and health training requirements

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General administrative rules

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Rules for all workplaces

437-001-0760 Rules for all workplaces

Employees must be properly instructed and supervised in the safe operation of machinery, tools, equipment, processes, or practices that they are authorized to use.

Rules for workplace safety committees

437-001-0765 Rules for workplace safety committees

Safety committee members must have training in the principles of accident and incident investigations and hazard identification.

Safety committees must establish procedures for conducting workplace safety and health inspections. People trained in hazard identification must conduct inspections (they don't have to be safety committee members).

Loss-prevention services

437-001-1035 Loss-prevention services

Insurers must make health and safety loss-prevention services available to their insured employers.

Loss-prevention services include identifying employers' health and safety training needs.

Required loss-prevention services

437-001-1040 Required loss-prevention services

Insurers must offer to help develop a loss-prevention plan for each of its employers with a claims frequency or severity greater than the average for employers in the same industry.

The plan must include training practices and follow-up training.

Self-insured employers

437-001-1060 Self-insured employers

Self-insured employers and employers in a group self-insurance program must have loss-prevention programs that include training practices and follow-up training.

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General occupational safety and health rules

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Periodic training

A summary of Division 2, General occupational safety and health rules that have periodic training requirements.

Emergency action plan

2/E 437-002-0042 Emergency action plan

An emergency action plan describes how employees will respond to emergencies such as fires, toxic chemical releases, severe weather, and floods.

If your workplace has more than 10 employees and must comply with any of the following rules, it must have a written emergency action plan:

  • Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals – 1910.119
  • Hazardous waste operations and emergency response – 1910.120
  • Portable fire extinguishers – 437-002-0187
  • Fixed extinguishing systems, general – 1910.160
  • Fire detection systems – 1910.164
  • Grain handling facilities – 1910.272
  • Ethylene oxide – 1910.1047
  • Methylenedianiline – 1910.1050
  • 1-3 Butadiene – 1910.1051
  • Methylenedianiline – 1926.60

Training required by emergency action plans:

  • Designate and train a sufficient number of employees to assist in a safe and orderly evacuation in an emergency.
  • Review with new employees those parts of your emergency action plan that they must know during an emergency. Also, review the plan with employees whenever their responsibilities under the plan change or the plan itself changes.
  • If your workplace has 10 or fewer employees, the emergency action plan does not have to be in writing and you can verbally describe the plan to employees.

Fire prevention plan

2/E 437-002-0043 Fire prevention plan

If your workplace has more than 10 employees and must comply with any of the following rules, it must have a written fire prevention plan:

  • Portable fire extinguishers – 437-002-0187
  • Ethylene oxide – 1910.1047
  • Methylenedianiline – 1910.1050
  • 1-3 Butadiene – 1910.1051
  • Methylenedianiline – 1926.60

Review with employees – before their initial assignments – the parts of the fire prevention plan they must know in emergencies and inform them about fire hazards they might be exposed to. The plan must be in the workplace and available for employees to review.

If your workplace has 10 or fewer employees, the fire prevention plan does not have to be in writing and you can describe the plan to them verbally.

Powered platforms for exterior building maintenance

2/F 1910.66 Powered platforms for exterior building maintenance

Powered platforms must be operated only by employees who are trained in:

  • Recognizing and preventing hazards associated with their work tasks
  • Recognizing and preventing powered-platform hazards
  • Emergency action plan procedures
  • Work procedures for operating and inspecting working platforms
  • Personal fall-arrest system inspection, care, and use

Emergency planning. Each working platform must have a written emergency action plan that explains emergency procedures, escape routes, and alarms. Review the plan with employees before they first use the platform and whenever the plan is changed.

Competent person. A designated competent person must train employees to operate and inspect powered platforms.

Certification. Certify that employees have been trained to operate and inspect powered platforms, documenting their names, trainer signatures, and training dates. Maintain

Occupational noise exposure

2/G 1910.95 Occupational noise exposure

You must have an annual training program for employees exposed to noise at or above an eight-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels. The program must be updated to reflect changes in personal protective equipment and work processes.

Those exposed to noise at or above the 85-decibel limit must be fitted with hearing protectors and trained how to use and care for them.

Hydrogen

2/H 1910.103 Hydrogen

This rule applies to liquefied hydrogen systems on consumer premises. Maintain legible written operating instructions at installations that require employees to operate the equipment.

Hydrogen process equipment operators must keep legible operating instructions at their work locations. A qualified person must be present when a mobile hydrogen supply unit is being unloaded.

Explosives and blasting agents

2/H 1910.109 Explosives and blasting agents

Transporting explosives. Motor vehicles that transport explosives must be equipped with fully charged fire extinguishers and drivers must be trained to use them. Every vehicle transporting Class A or Class B explosives must be attended by a person who knows the class of explosive material and its dangers. The attendant must be trained to protect the public from those dangers.

Bulk delivery and mixing vehicles. The operator must be trained in the safe operation of the vehicle and its mixing and conveying equipment. The operator must be familiar with the commodities being delivered and the general procedure for handling emergencies.

Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gasses

2/H 1910.110 Storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gasses

Employees whose work involves installing, removing, operating, and maintaining LP gas must be properly trained. When standard watch service is provided at LP gas installations, attending personnel must be appropriately trained.

Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals

2/H 1910.119 Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals

Employees who do chemical-process work must be trained in the hazards, emergency operations, and safe work practices applicable to their jobs. Certify that employees understand the training; include each employee's name and training date.

Employees must have refresher training at least every three years to ensure that they understand current operating procedures.

Contract employers must ensure that their employees are trained in performing their jobs safely in fire, explosion, and toxic-release situations, and in the contracting company's emergency action plan. Ensure that employees understand the training. Document their names, training dates, and how you determined that they understood the training.

Employees who maintain process equipment must be trained in the equipment's hazards and operating procedures. Maintenance and contract workers whose job tasks are affected by a process change must receive information and training about the changed process.

Hazardous waste operations and emergency response

2/H 1910.120 Hazardous waste operations and emergency response

After hazardous substances at a site have been identified, the risks associated with the substances must be established and employees must be informed of the risks.

Employees must be trained before they are permitted to work with hazardous waste. They cannot participate in or supervise field activities until they have been trained at the level required by their jobs and responsibilities. Training must cover the following:

  • Names of employees and alternates responsible for worksite safety and health
  • Hazards on the site
  • Use of personal protective equipment
  • Safe work practices
  • Engineering controls and equipment used on site
  • Medical surveillance requirements
  • Site safety and health plan requirements

Training for workers

General site workers, such as equipment operators, general laborers, and supervisory personnel whose activities expose them to hazardous substances, must have at least 40 hours of instruction and three days of supervised field experience.

Workers who are on site only to accomplish a specific task and who are unlikely to be exposed over permissible exposure limits must have at least 24 hours of instruction and one day of supervised field experience.

Workers regularly on site must have at least 24 hours of instruction and one day of supervised field experience if they work in areas where exposures are under permissible limits, where respirators are not necessary, and where there are no health hazards or possible emergencies.

Workers with 24 hours of training who become general site workers or who are required to wear respirators must have an additional 16 hours of instruction and two days of field training to equal the 40-hour training requirement for general site workers.

On-site managers and supervisors directly responsible for those engaged in hazardous-waste operations must have 40 hours of general training, three days of supervised field experience, and at least eight additional hours of specialized training.

Training should cover your safety and health program, personal protective equipment, spill containment, and health-hazard monitoring procedures. Training may be reduced to 24 hours and one day for supervisors of workers who work on site occasionally or who work in areas where hazards don't exceed permissible exposure limits and where respirators are not required.

Trainers must have satisfactorily completed a training program for teaching required subjects or they must have appropriate academic credentials and experience; they must be able to demonstrate instructional skills and knowledge in the required subjects.

Employees must be certified to work with hazardous waste. Those who have successfully completed hazardous-waste training must be certified by their instructors and must receive certificates. Employees who have not been certified or who do not have the required training cannot do hazardous-waste work.

Annual refresher training is required. Those who work on site and who are exposed to hazardous substances must have eight hours of annual refresher training.

Equivalent training is an option. If you can show that an employee's hazardous-waste experience or training is equivalent to the requirements of 1910.120(e)(1)-(4), you do not have to provide initial training. However, certified employees or those with equivalent training who are new to a site must receive appropriate, site-specific training and must have supervised field experience at the new site.

Emergency-response training is required. Those who respond to hazardous emergencies at hazardous-waste cleanup sites must be trained to respond safely to the emergencies.

Rehearse your emergency-response plan. Rehearse your emergency-response plan regularly as part of your overall training program for site operations. Inform workers at commercial laundries or cleaning establishments. Workers who decontaminate protective clothing or equipment must be informed about harmful effects of exposure to hazardous substances.

Training for emergency responders

Training must be matched to the tasks performed by each emergency responder. New responders must have appropriate skills before they take part in actual emergencies. Employees who participate in emergency-response activities must be trained in one of the following classifications:

  • First responder, awareness level
  • First responder, operations level
  • Hazardous materials technician
  • Hazardous materials specialist
  • On-scene incident commander

Skilled equipment workers who are needed temporarily to perform immediate emergency support and who may be exposed to hazards at an emergency do not need to meet the training requirements for other responders; however, they must be briefed at the site before participating. The briefing must cover the duties they will perform, use of personal protective equipment, and the chemical hazards involved. Those who work with hazardous substances and who might be called upon to give technical advice must receive annual training or demonstrate competency in their area of specialization.

First responders at the awareness level are those most likely to encounter hazardous substance releases and who notify authorities of the release. First responders at the awareness level must have training or sufficient experience to demonstrate the following:

  • An understanding of hazardous substances and the risks associated with them
  • An understanding of potential outcomes of an emergency involving hazardous substances
  • The ability to identify hazardous substances in an emergency
  • An understanding of the first-responder awareness level role in the employer's emergency response plan
  • The ability to recognize when additional emergency resources are needed and to notify appropriate responders

First responders at the operations level respond to hazardous substance releases to protect people, property, or the environment. They are trained to respond defensively rather than to stop the release. Their job is to contain the release from a safe distance, keep it from spreading, and prevent exposures. First responders at the operations level must have at least eight hours of training or sufficient experience that demonstrates the following:

  • Knowledge of hazard- and risk-assessment techniques
  • Knowledge of selecting and using personal protective equipment
  • An understanding of hazardous-material terms
  • Knowledge of control, containment, and confinement work with available resources
  • Knowledge of implementing decontamination procedures
  • An understanding of operation and termination procedures

Hazardous-materials technicians are trained to stop a hazardous substance release; they have a bigger role than that of first responders at the operations level. Hazardous-materials technicians must have at least 24 hours of training equivalent to the first-responder operations level and they must know how to do the following:

  • Implement the employer's emergency-response plan
  • Use field survey instruments to classify, identify, and verify materials
  • Work an assigned role in the incident command system
  • Select and use personal protective equipment
  • Understand hazard- and risk-assessment techniques
  • Perform advanced control, containment, and confinement operations
  • Understand and implement decontamination procedures
  • Understand termination procedures
  • Understand basic chemical and toxicological terms

Hazardous-materials specialists support hazardous-materials technicians. The hazardous-materials specialist also acts as the site liaison with federal, state, local, and other government authorities. Hazardous-materials specialists must have at least 24 hours of training, equivalent to that required for the technician level and must know the following:

  • How to implement the local emergency-response plan
  • How to classify, identify, and verify materials
  • The state emergency-response plan
  • How to select and use personal protective equipment
  • In-depth hazard and risk techniques
  • How to perform specialized control, containment, and confinement operations
  • How to determine and implement decontamination procedures
  • How to develop a site safety and control plan
  • Chemical, radiology, and toxicology terminology

On-scene incident commanders who assume control of incident scenes beyond the first responder awareness level must have at least 24 hours of training equal to the first responder operations level and must know the following:

  • How to implement the employer's incident-command system
  • How to implement the employer's emergency-response plan
  • Hazards associated with working in chemical-protective clothing
  • How to implement the local emergency-response plan
  • The state emergency-response plan and the Federal Regional Response Team
  • The importance of decontamination procedures

Trainers must complete courses for their subjects or they must have equivalent academic credentials and instructional experience.

Annual refresher training is required. Those who have been trained in emergency-response planning must have annual refresher training. The employer must issue a statement of competency for each employee and keep a record of the method used to demonstrate competency.

Train those who do cleanup on plant property. Employees who do cleanup on plant property after an emergency must have training in the following areas:

  • Emergency plans and fire-prevention plans
  • Respiratory protection
  • Hazard communication
  • Safety and health training relevant to the tasks they are expected to perform

Training required at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

Train employees exposed to health hazards or hazardous substances at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. New employees must have 24 hours of initial training and eight hours of annual refresher training. Those who have successfully completed the initial training must receive a certificate attesting that they have done so. If you can show that an employee's experience and training meet the required training, you can waive initial training.

All employees must have eight hours of annual refresher training.

Trainers must satisfactorily complete courses in the subjects they teach or have equivalent academic credentials and experience.

Emergency responders must be trained before they respond to real emergencies. Training must cover emergency-response plans, standard operating procedures, how to use personal protective equipment, and emergency procedures. There are two cases in which you do not need to train all employees for emergency-response activities:

  1. Your workforce is divided so that a sufficient number of employees have the requisite training and others can recognize an emergency and summon trained responders.
  2. You have made arrangements in advance for an outside emergency team to respond and your employees can recognize an emergency and call the response team.

Members of disposal-facility emergency-response teams must be trained to recognize health and safety hazards so they can protect themselves and others. Training must cover the following:

  • Methods to minimize safety and health hazards
  • Safe use of control equipment
  • Selection and use of personal protective equipment
  • Safe operating procedures
  • How to coordinate with other workers to minimize risk
  • Appropriate responses to overexposure
  • How to recognize symptoms resulting from overexposure

Trained employees must be certified. Document that each employee has attended and successfully completed emergency-response training.

Rehearse the emergency-response plan. Responders must regularly rehearse your emergency response plan as part of the overall training program for site operations.

Oregon rules for reinforced plastics manufacturing

2/H 437-002-0118 Oregon rules for reinforced plastics manufacturing

Train workers to handle materials safely. Training must include instruction in the following:

  • Storage and handling
  • Cleanup and disposal of spill
  • First aid for spills
  • Potential health and safety hazard
  • Personal hygiene
  • Personal protective measures and labeling

Eye protection. An eyewash fountain must be available no more than 25 feet or 15 seconds from any work area where methylethyl ketone peroxide is being mixed or transferred.

The 15-second criterion applies if other workers are close enough under normal working conditions to offer assistance and if you have a formal training program that includes first-aid procedures for eye injuries.

Identification labels. Hazardous-material identification labels must be on all containers of discarded hazardous chemicals. Labels are not required on small containers used and discarded in one work shift. Descriptions explaining the labeling system must be prominently posted in the workplace. Workers must be trained so that they understand what the labels mean.

Personal protective equipment

2/I 437-002-0134 Personal protective equipment

This rule applies to personal protective equipment and other protective equipment for the eyes, face, head, extremities, and torso, including protective clothing, respiratory devices, and protective shields and barriers.

Employees who use PPE must be trained on the following:

  • When PPE is necessary
  • What PPE is necessary
  • How to properly put on, remove, adjust, and wear PPE
  • The limitations of the PPE
  • The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the PPE

Each employee must understand the training and demonstrate the ability to use the PPE properly.

Employees must be retrained when they cannot demonstrate required skills and when there are changes in the workplace or the PPE that make previous training obsolete.

Respiratory protection

2/I 1910.134 Respiratory protection

Train employees to use respirators properly. Training must focus on:

  • Why a respirator is necessary
  • The importance of proper fit
  • A respirator's capabilities and limitations
  • How to use a respirator in emergencies
  • How to care for a respirator

New employees who have had respirator training within 12 months of their hire date are exempt from training for their first year on the job if they can demonstrate they know how to use and maintain their respirators.

Retraining is required at least annually, sooner if worksite hazards change or if employees switch to another type of respirator. Employees who do not understand how to use or properly care for their respirators also must be retrained.

Any employee not required to wear a respirator who asks to wear one must read 1910.134, Appendix D, Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard.

Accident prevention signs and tags

2/J 1910.145 Accident prevention signs and tags

All employees must be instructed that danger signs indicate immediate danger and that caution signs indicate possible hazards against which proper precaution should be taken.

Confined spaces

2/J 437-002-0146 Confined spaces

Employees involved in permit space work must have the understanding, knowledge, and skills about permit spaces necessary to perform their duties.

Training is required for new employees and for all other employees:

  • Before an employee is assigned permit-space dutie
  • Before there is a change in an employee's assigned duties
  • When there is a new permit space hazard for which an employee has not been trained
  • When there are changes to the written permit-space program
  • When a review of an entry permit identifies problems with an entr
  • When there is a deviation from established procedures or an employee's knowledge of the procedures is inadequate

Record each employee's training, including the employee's name, the trainer's signature, the training date, and the employee's responsibilities. Employees must be able to inspect their training records.

Awareness training for employees who work near permit spaces

Provide awareness training to all employees who work in areas where permit spaces are present. Repeat the training when there is a change in the written permit-space program and when there are new or previously unidentified permit spaces.

Awareness training must explain:

  • The written permit-space program
  • How to recognize a permit space
  • How entry is authorized by the entry permit
  • How entry is authorized by the alternate entry procedures (if used)

The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)

2/J 1910.147 The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)

If you have employees who service equipment that could start or move unexpectedly, you must document energy-control procedures, periodic inspections, and employee training to ensure that employees are protected.

Establish energy-control procedures, training, and periodic inspections to ensure that workers can safely service machinery and equipment. Authorized employees must have training in using and removing energy controls. All others who work in areas where energy-control procedures are in effect must also know the procedures. When tagout systems are used, workers must understand the limitations of tags.

Document that workers are trained and that their training is current. Include each worker's name and training dates.

Each lock or tag must be removed from its energy-isolating device by the employee who applied it. There is one exception: When the authorized employee who applied the lock or tag is not available to remove it, you can authorize another person to remove it, provided that procedures and training for removal are part of your energy-control program.

Medical services and first aid

2/K 437-002-0161 Medical services and first aid

If a clinic, hospital, or physician is not reasonably accessible to the worksite, a person trained in first aid must be available on site.

Portable fire extinguishers

2/L 437-002-0187 Portable fire extinguishers

Provide training upon initial assignment and at least annually for employees who are designated to use fire extinguishers.

Training must familiarize the employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use, fire hazards, and the use of appropriate equipment.

Training may also include controlled fires (check with local authorities) to train employees in the proper use of extinguishers.

Standpipe and hose systems

2/L 1910.158 Standpipe and hose systems

Only trained personnel can inspect standpipe and hose systems.

Fixed extinguishing systems, general

2/L 1910.160 Fixed extinguishing systems, general

Designate and annually train employees to inspect and maintain fixed extinguishing systems.

Fire-detection systems

2/L 1910.164 Fire-detection systems

Be sure that trained personnel service, maintain, and test fire-detection systems.

Employee alarm systems

2/L 1910.165 Employee alarm systems

Maintenance. Only trained people must service, maintain, and test employee alarms.

Reporting emergencies. Employees must understand how to report emergencies at your workplace. If telephones are used to report emergencies, post the phone numbers for reporting emergencies near the telephones or on employee bulletin boards.

Oregon rules for firefighters

2/L 437-002-0182 Oregon rules for firefighters

Fire departments must have a written policy that describes the organizational structure, functions, and frequency of training provided to firefighters. Employees who participate in exempted firefighting activities must be properly trained, protected, clothed, and equipped. All firefighters must attend regularly scheduled safety and health training.

Develop and maintain employees' skills throughout the firefighting ranks and train them before they begin their assigned duties. Before firefighters participate in structural firefighting activities or live fire training, they must meet the entry-level firefighter training as prescribed by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), or have equivalent training.

Live fire training must be conducted under the direction of a fire-department training officer and must follow the General Requirements for Live Fire Training established by the state fire marshal.

Hazardous-materials response. Fire departments that respond to hazardous-material incidents must develop written plans that include training policies and response procedures.

Respiratory-protection training. Train firefighters before they use self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) to enter uncontrolled contaminated or oxygen-deficient atmospheres; they must annually demonstrate their proficiency.

Confined space rescue. Train responders to recognize inherent confined space hazards before assigning or attempting any related duties in confined space rescues.

Servicing multi-piece and single-piece rim wheels

2/N 1910.177 Servicing multi-piece and single-piece rim wheels

You must have a training program for employees who service rim wheels. The program must describe work hazards and safety procedures. Evaluate employees' ability to service rim wheels and give additional training to those who are not proficient.

Powered industrial trucks

2/N 1910.178 Powered industrial trucks

Employers must train powered industrial truck operators with programs tailored to the employees' existing operating skills, the types of industrial trucks the employees run, and hazards the employees are likely to encounter.

Refresher training is required if an operator is involved in an accident or near-miss incident, operates the truck in an unsafe manner, or is assigned to operate another type of truck.

Operator performance evaluations are required at least once every three years.

Handling materials, additional Oregon rules

2/N 437-002-0221 Handling materials, additional Oregon rules

Regularly assigned, trained operators must operate hoisting machines, except those equipped with automotive controls.

Oregon rules for commercial and industrial vehicles

2/N 437-002-0223 Oregon rules for commercial and industrial vehicles

Only trained, authorized operators can operate commercial or industrial vehicles. You must have specific procedures to train those who operate industrial vehicles for non-highway use.

Oregon general requirements for cranes

2/N 437-002-0228 Oregon general requirements for cranes

Employees who operate cranes or derricks must be properly trained, have sufficient practical experience, and follow written operating procedures. Keep written records of operators' training and operating experience.

Overhead and gantry cranes

2/N 1910.179 Overhead and gantry cranes

Using fire extinguishers. Operators and maintenance people must know how to use on-board fire extinguishers.

Maintaining crane hooks. Repairing crane hooks by welding or reshaping is not recommended; however, if repairs are attempted, they must be done under the supervision of a competent person and the hook must be tested before further use.

Moving the load. When two or more cranes are used to lift a load, a qualified person must supervise the operation and instruct all personnel involved in proper positioning, rigging, and moving the load.

Mechanical power presses

2/O 1910.217 Mechanical power presses

Only trained employees can inspect and maintain power presses. Provide enough supervision to ensure that operators follow correct operating procedures; train them before they begin work and at least once a year thereafter. Employees who use presses in the presence-sensing device initiation (PSDI) mode must have training that covers the following:

  • The manufacturer's recommended test procedures for checking the presence-sensing device
  • Required safety distances
  • Operation, function, and performance of the PSDI mode
  • Requirements for hand tools used in the PSDI mode
  • Consequences of overriding the safeguard functions of the PSDI system

Certify that employees are trained; document each employee's name, the trainer's signature, and training date; keep the records for the duration of their employment.

Forging machines

2/O 1910.218 Forging machines

Maintain forge shop equipment so that it will operate safely and ensure that employees are trained to inspect and repair the equipment.

Stationary compactors, self-contained compactors and balers

2/O 437-002-0256 Stationary compactors, self-contained compactors and balers

You must:

  • Train and supervise equipment operators. Training must include information from the operation manual, when available, and these rules.
  • Document the names of the trainers, trainees, and the training dates.
  • Instruct all employees how to identify and report exposure to hazards.

Ensure that only trained employees authorized by management, or service technicians, are allowed to maintain and repair the equipment. Qualified employees must demonstrate a proficiency in maintaining and repairing the equipment.

Welding, cutting, and brazing – general requirements

2/Q 1910.252 Welding, cutting, and brazing – general requirements

Ensure that cutters or welders and their supervisors understand their work process and are trained to operate their equipment safety.

Fire watchers must have fire-extinguishing equipment readily available, be trained to use it, and be familiar with the means for sounding a fire alarm.

Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting

2/Q 1910.253 Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting

Employees in charge of the oxygen or fuel-gas supply equipment, including generators, and oxygen or fuel-gas distribution piping systems must be instructed and competent before being left in charge.

Rules and instructions covering the operation and maintenance of oxygen or fuel-gas supply equipment, including generators and oxygen or fuel-gas distribution piping systems must be available to employees.

When regulators or parts of regulators, including gauges, need repair, properly instructed mechanics must perform the work.

Arc welding and cutting

2/Q 1910.254 Arc welding and cutting

Employees who operate arc-welding equipment must be properly instructed and qualified.

Employees assigned to operate or maintain arc-welding equipment must be acquainted with the requirements of 1910.252(d) and with 1910.252(a), (b) and (c); if they do gas-shielded arc welding, they must also know Recommended Safe Practices for Gas-Shielded Arc Welding, A6.1-1966, American Welding Society.

Laundry machinery and operations

2/R 1910.264 Laundry machinery and operations

Employees must be instructed in the hazards of their work and in safe work practices.

Telecommunications

2/R 1910.268 Telecommunications

Employees must be trained in safe telecommunications work practices before they begin work. Training can be on the job, in the classroom, or combined. Training must cover emergency procedures, first aid, and how to recognize harmful substances, animals, insects, and plants.

Certify that employees have been trained; document their names, the trainer's signature, and training dates. Documentation must be prepared at the end of training and maintained for the duration of each employee's employment.

Storage batteries. Those who work with storage batteries must be instructed in emergency procedures such as dealing with acid spills.

Derricks. Manufacturers' specifications, load ratings, and instructions for operating derricks must be strictly observed. Post rated-load capacities and instructions for derrick operation on a permanent weather-resistant plate on the derrick where the operator can see them. Make sure that operators are trained as required by 437-002-0228(2), Division 2/N, Crane Operator Training Requirements. A competent person must inspect derricks at least once a year.

High-voltage work. Employees using high voltage to locate trouble or to test cables must be instructed in precautions for their own safety and for the safety of co-workers.

Manhole work, first aid. A person trained in first aid must be immediately available to assist a worker who encounters a hazard in a manhole.

Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution

2/R 1910.269 Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution

Employees must be trained in all safety-related work practices affecting electric power generation, transmission, and distribution work, including pole-top and manhole rescue. All training must be in the classroom or on the job. Employees must be able to do the following:

  • Distinguish exposed live parts of electric equipment
  • Determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts
  • Determine minimum approach distances for the voltages to which they are exposed
  • Demonstrate safe techniques for working on or near exposed energized equipment

An employee must have additional training (or retraining) whenever the following occurs:

  • The employee is not complying with safety practices
  • Changes in technology, equipment, or procedures require new work practices
  • The employee is assigned to do work other than his or her normal job tasks

Certification. Certify that each employee has been trained; documentation must be on file for the duration of the employee's employment.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-aid training. When anyone works on exposed lines or equipment energized at 50 volts or more, a person trained in first aid and CPR also must be on site. If two or more employees are doing fieldwork, at least two people trained in first aid must be available. If employees were trained in first aid and CPR within three months of their hiring date, only one person must be available on site.

At fixed work locations such as generating stations, each employee exposed to electric-shock hazards must be reachable within four minutes by a person trained in first aid and CPR.

Energy-control program. Employees who service or maintain machines must be trained to recognize hazardous energy sources, isolate them, and control the energy. Employees who use tagout systems must be trained to use them appropriately.

Enclosed spaces. Employees who enter enclosed spaces or who serve as attendants must be trained in enclosed space hazards and entry and rescue procedures.

Two-worker rule. No fewer than two journeymen, or workers with equivalent training and experience, are required for work on energized high-voltage equipment. A qualified apprentice may work in place of one of the journeymen for training. There are exceptions to this requirement; for more information, see 437-002-0317(1)(b), Additional Oregon Rules for Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution.

Grain-handling facilities

2/R 1910.272 Grain-handling facilities

Train employees annually and whenever changes in their job assignments expose them to new hazards. They must be trained in the following:

  • General safety precautions, including measures to prevent dust accumulation
  • Specific job-related safety practices such as cleaning grinding equipment, clearing choked legs, and lockout/tagout procedures

Special tasks. Employees assigned special tasks such as bin entry and handling flammable or toxic substances must be trained to perform the tasks safely.

Observers. Employees acting as observers must be trained in rescue procedures, including procedures for obtaining assistance.

Tree and shrub services

Training and work planning

2/R 437-002-0303 Tree and shrub services (training and work planning)

Instruct employees in the proper use of all equipment provided for them and require that safe working practices be observed. A job safety briefing with all crew members is required and all work procedures and assignments must be worked out carefully before any tree job begins.

First aid requirements

2/R 437-002-0304 Tree and shrub services (first aid requirements)

First-aid care and supplies must be provided as required by 437-002-0161, Medical Services and First Aid.

Employees must be able to render cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and be trained in tree-top rescue.

Personal protective equipment

2/R 437-002-0307 Tree and shrub services (personal protective equipment)

When operating chain saws or other noisy equipment, employees must wear hearing protection that complies with 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure.

Provide hearing protection at no cost to employees and allow them to choose from a variety of suitable devices.

Train the employees in the proper use and care of the hearing protection.

Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills

2/R 437-002-0312 Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills

Employees cannot operate pulp and paper equipment until they have received training and are familiar with safe operating procedures. They must also be trained in proper lifting or moving techniques.

Employees entering hazardous-substance areas must be trained to deal with breaks, ruptures, or spills.

Employees assigned to work alone in remote areas must report to a designated person or have someone check to make sure they are safe; employees and check-up personnel must be trained in the reporting procedures.

Industrial kiln guns and ammunition. Develop written instructions for storing and operating industrial kiln guns and ammunition, including safety procedures. All those working with this equipment must be instructed in the procedures.

Recovery furnace area. All those working in recovery furnace areas must be instructed in emergency procedures.

Handling chlorine dioxide. Provide written instructions and safety procedures for operating and maintaining the generator. Those working on the equipment must be trained in these procedures.

Handling sodium chlorate. Employees handling sodium chlorate must be trained in handling precautions and safe work habits.

Electrical (training)

2/S 1910.332 Electrical (training)

Employees exposed to electric-shock hazards must be trained in the safety requirements relevant to their jobs. Both qualified and unqualified people must be trained. Unqualified people are those who may be exposed to electric-shock hazards during their jobs but who are not permitted to work on or near exposed energized equipment.

Commercial diving operations, qualifications of dive team

2/T 1910.410 Commercial diving operations, qualifications of dive team

Each member of the dive team must have the training to perform assigned tasks safely.

Training must also cover the following:

  • Appropriate tools and equipment
  • Diving techniques
  • Diving operations
  • Emergency procedures
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid

Divers exposed to hyperbaric conditions must be trained in diving-related physics and physiology. Dive-team members must be assigned tasks suited to their experience and training.

Workers in training must perform tasks under the supervision of an experienced dive-team member. The person in charge must have the experience and training necessary to conduct an assigned diving operation safely.

Asbestos

2/Z 1910.1001 Asbestos

Annually train employees exposed to airborne concentrations of asbestos at or above the permissible exposure limit and excursion limit.

All asbestos training must cover the following:

  • Methods of recognizing asbestos
  • Health effects associated with asbestos exposure
  • The relationship among smoking, asbestos, and lung cancer
  • Operations that could result in exposure to asbestos
  • Proper use of respirators
  • Appropriate work practices for asbestos jobs
  • Medical surveillance program requirements
  • Public health organizations that help employees quit smoking
  • Requirements for posting signs

Access to training materials. Make written training documents and a copy of 1910.1001 available to employees.

Training records. Keep training records for one year beyond each employee's last employment date.

13 carcinogens

2/Z 1910.1003 13 carcinogens

The requirements in this rule apply to the following hazardous substances:

  • 4-Nitrobiphenyl
  • alpha-Naphthylamine
  • methyl chloromethyl ether
  • 3,3•-Dichlorobenzidine (and its salts)
  • bis-Chloromethyl ether
  • beta-Naphthylamine
  • Benzidine
  • 4-Aminodiphenyl
  • Ethyleneimine
  • beta-Propiolactone
  • 2-Acetylaminofluorene
  • 4-Dimethylaminoazo-benezene
  • N-Nitrosodimethylamine

Each employee, before being authorized to enter a regulated area, must receive training that covers:

  • The nature of the carcinogenic hazards
  • The nature of the operation that could result in exposure
  • The medical surveillance program
  • Decontamination practices
  • Emergency procedures and the employees' roles in the procedures
  • Information to aid employees in recognizing and evaluating conditions that may result in the release of a carcinogen
  • First-aid procedures
  • A review of this rule at the employee's first training and annually thereafter

Vinyl chloride

2/Z 1910.1017 Vinyl chloride

Employees working with vinyl chloride (or polyvinyl chloride) before conversion to fabricated products must be trained in its hazards and safe work practices. Training must cover:

  • Health hazards of chronic vinyl chloride exposure
  • Operations that could expose employees to vinyl chloride in excess of the permissible exposure limi
  • The purpose for, proper use of, and limitations of personal protective equipment
  • Vinyl chloride fire hazards
  • Monitoring and medical-surveillance programs
  • Emergency procedures
  • Conditions that may result in the release of vinyl chloride
  • A review of 1910.1017 at the employee's first training and annually thereafter

Inorganic arsenic

2/Z 1910.1018 Inorganic arsenic

Employees who are exposed to inorganic arsenic above the action level or who develop skin or eye irritations must have annual training.

Employees who use respirators must have quarterly training that covers:

  • Operations that could result in exposure to inorganic arsenic
  • The proper use of respirators
  • Medical surveillance
  • Engineering controls and work practices
  • The requirements of 1910.1018

Any employee who has difficulty breathing while wearing a respirator must be examined by a physician trained in pulmonary medicine to determine whether the employee can wear a respirator while performing a required task.

Access to training materials. Make 1910.1018 available for employees to review.

Lead

2/Z 1910.1025 Lead

All employees exposed to lead at or above the action level or to lead compounds that may cause skin or eye irritation must participate in an annual lead-hazards training program covering the following:

  • The requirements of 1910.1025 and its appendices
  • Operations that could result in exposure to lead above the action level
  • The purpose, proper selection, fitting, and use of respirators
  • The medical-surveillance program and the medical-removal protection program
  • Engineering controls and work practices
  • Any compliance plan in effect
  • Prohibitions against removing lead with chelating agents without the direction of a licensed physician
  • Employees' right of access to records

Chromium (VI)

2/Z 1910.1026 Chromium (VI)

Employees who may be exposed to Chromium (VI) must be able to demonstrate knowledge of:

  • The requirements of 1910.1026
  • The purpose of the medical surveillance program required by 1910.1026

A copy of 1910.1026 must be available at no cost to all affected employees.

Cadmium

2/Z 1910.1027 Cadmium

Employees whose work involves potential exposure to cadmium must have annual training that covers:

  • Health hazards associated with cadmium
  • Operations that could result in exposure to cadmium
  • How employees can protect themselves from cadmium exposure
  • The proper use of respirators and protective clothing
  • The purpose of the medical surveillance program

You must also comply with the training requirements of 1910.1200, Hazard communication.

Certify that employees have been trained. Document their names, the trainer's signature, and the training dates. Keep the records for one year.

Benzene

2/Z 1910.1028 Benzene

Train employees before they work in areas where benzene is present. If exposures are above the action level, employees must be trained at least annually.

Training must be in accordance with the hazard communication training required by 1910.1200(h). You must also explain to employees your medical surveillance program and your training requirements for benzene.

Except for licensed physicians, those who administer pulmonary function testing must complete a training course in spirometry sponsored by an appropriate governmental, academic, or professional institution.

Coke oven emissions

2/Z 1910.1029 Coke oven emissions

You must have annual training for employees exposed to coke oven emissions that covers:

  • The information contained in the substance information sheet for coke oven emissions, 1910.1029, Appendix A
  • The purpose, proper use, and limitations of respirators
  • A review of 1910.1029

Bloodborne pathogens

2/Z 1910.1030 Bloodborne pathogens

Employees exposed to bloodborne pathogens must have annual training that includes:

  • The requirements of 1910.1030
  • The epidemiology, symptoms, and transmission modes of bloodborne pathogens
  • The exposure-control plan and how to obtain a copy of the plan
  • Tasks that may involve exposure to blood and other infectious materials
  • Methods that prevent or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens
  • Hepatitis B vaccine, including vaccination benefits
  • Appropriate actions to take and whom to contact for emergencies involving blood or other potentially infectious materials
  • Procedures to follow if an exposure occurs
  • Information on post-exposure evaluation and follow up after an exposure
  • Information regarding warning signs and labels

The person conducting the training must be familiar with the requirements of 1910.1030 and how they apply to employees' tasks.

Additional training for employees in HIV/HBV laboratories and production facilities

Employees in HIV or HBV research laboratories or production facilities must have the following initial training in addition to the above requirements:

  • Proficiency in standard microbiological techniques and in practices specific to the facility
  • Prior experience in handling human pathogens or tissue cultures

Train employees who have no experience handling human pathogens. An employee's initial activities cannot include handling infectious agents; assign these activities only after workers have learned appropriate handling techniques and can accomplish them proficiently.

Training records. Keep training records for three years. Records must include:

  • The dates of training sessions
  • A summary of training material
  • Names and qualifications of people conducting training
  • Names and job titles of all people attending training

Biosafety manual. Prepare a biosafety manual for workers and have them review it annually.

Cotton dust

2/Z 1910.1043 Cotton dust

Annually train all employees exposed to cotton dust. Training must cover:

  • Acute and long-term health hazards associated with cotton dust exposure
  • Jobs and processes that could result in exposure to cotton dust at or above the permissible exposure limit
  • Measures necessary to protect employees from exposure in excess of the permissible exposure limit
  • The proper use of respirators
  • Medical surveillance
  • The requirements of 1910.1043

Provide training materials to Oregon OSHA upon request.

Pulmonary function testing. With the exception of licensed physicians, those who administer pulmonary function testing must complete a training course in spirometry sponsored by an appropriate academic or professional institution.

1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane

2/Z 1910.1044 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane

You must provide training for all employees who may be exposed to 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane that covers:

  • The information in the Substance Safety Data Sheet for 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (see 1910.1044, Appendix A)
  • The quantity, location, and operations that could result in exposure to 1,2-dibromo-3- chloropropane
  • The proper use of respirators
  • A description of the medical surveillance program

Access to training materials. A copy of the program must be available to all affected employees.

Each year, inform employees about the information in the Substance Safety Data Sheet and in safe practices for using 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane.

Acrylonitrile

2/Z 1910.1045 Acrylonitrile

Provide training for employees exposed to acrylonitrile above the action level, employees whose exposures are maintained below the action level by engineering and work practice controls, and employees subject to potential skin or eye contact with liquid acrylonitrile.

Employees must be informed about the following:

  • Operations involving exposure to acrylonitrile
  • The purpose of the medical surveillance program
  • Emergency and first-aid procedures
  • Proper use of respirators and protective clothing
  • Conditions that could cause the release of acrylonitrile

Employees must review this information at their initial training and annually thereafter.

Ethylene oxide

2/Z 1910.1047 Ethylene oxide

Provide annual training to employees exposed to ethylene oxide at or above the action level that covers:

  • Methods to detect the presence or release of ethylene oxide in the work area
  • Information on ethylene oxide hazards
  • Methods employees can use to protect themselves from ethylene oxide hazards
  • The hazard communication program

Header

2/Z 1910.1048 Formaldehyde

Only people trained to recognize formaldehyde hazards are permitted to enter regulated areas or to remove contaminated material from storage areas for cleaning, laundering, or disposal.

Leaks or spills must be cleaned up promptly by employees wearing protective clothing and trained in clean-up methods.

Written hazard communication program. Develop, implement, and maintain a written hazard communication program for formaldehyde that describes how requirements will be met for labels, safety data sheets, information, and training.

Information and training. Employees assigned to areas where formaldehyde exposure is at or above 0.1 ppm must participate in training before initial assignment or before new exposures to formaldehyde. Training must be repeated annually, covering:

  • The content of the safety data sheet for formaldehyde
  • The purpose of the medical surveillance program
  • Health hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure
  • The signs and symptoms of formaldehyde exposure
  • Instructions for reporting symptoms attributable to formaldehyde
  • A description of operations where formaldehyde is present
  • Safe work practices for limiting exposure to formaldehyde
  • Use of personal protective clothing and equipment
  • Instructions for handling spills and dealing with emergencies
  • Emergency procedures including the specific duties of each employee
  • A description of cleanup procedures
  • The importance of engineering and work-practice controls

Access to training materials. Inform employees where written training materials are located.

Methylenedianiline

2/Z 1910.1050 Methylenedianiline

Provide employees with information and training on methylenedianiline in accordance with Oregon OSHA's hazard communication training requirements in 1910.1200(h) at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter.

Make available to affected employees, without cost, all training program materials, including a copy of 1910.1050.

Keep training records for one year after an employee's termination date.

1,3, Butadiene

2/Z 1910.1051 1,3, Butadiene

Provide employees exposed to 1,3, butadiene with information and training in accordance with Oregon OSHA's hazard-communication rules in 1910.1200(h).

Employees who may be exposed to 1,3, butadiene at or above the action level must be trained before an initial job assignment and at least annually thereafter.

Training must cover:

  • The health hazards associated with 1,3, butadiene
  • A description of the medical surveillance program
  • The quantity, location, use, release, and storage of 1,3, butadiene
  • Operations that could result in exposure to 1,3, butadiene
  • Emergency procedures and personal protective equipment
  • Measures employees can take to protect themselves from exposure to 1,3, butadiene

Have a copy of 1910.1051 for employees to review.

Methylene chloride

2/Z 1910.1052 Methylene chloride

Provide all employees exposed to methylene chloride with information and training in accordance with the requirements of Oregon OSHA's hazard-communication rules in 1910.1200(h). Inform employees whose exposure to airborne concentrations of methylene chloride exceeds the action level about the quantities, locations, use, and storage requirements for methylene chloride.

Employees exposed to methylene chloride above the action level must be retrained as necessary so they continue to understand safe-use practices. Whenever tasks or procedures increase an employee's exposure above the action level, you must update the training to ensure that each affected employee remains proficient.

Ionizing radiation

2/Z 1910.1096 Ionizing radiation

All individuals working in or frequenting any portion of a radiation area must be informed of the following:

  • Radioactive materials or radiation in the area
  • Safety problems associated with exposure and ways to minimize exposure
  • Applicable provisions of 1910.1096 for the protection of employees from exposure
  • Reports of radiation exposures

Signal-generating systems. Those who work in areas covered by the system's signal must be familiar with the sound.

Hazard communication

2/Z 1910.1200 Hazard communication

Employers must provide employees with training and information on hazardous chemicals in their work areas at the time of initial assignment and whenever a new hazard is introduced. Training and information must cover:

  • The requirements of 1910.1200
  • Operations where hazardous chemicals are present
  • The location of the written hazard communication program
  • Methods to detect the presence or release of hazardous chemicals in the work area
  • Hazards of chemicals used in the work area
  • How employees can protect themselves from chemical hazards, including spills or leaks from sealed containers

Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories

2/Z 1910.1450 Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories

Train employees about the chemical hazards in their work areas before their initial assignments and before assignments involving new chemical exposures.

Training must cover:

  • Methods to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical
  • Chemical hazards in the work area
  • Methods of protection from chemical hazards
  • Details of the written chemical hygiene plan

If the composition of a chemical substance produced exclusively for laboratory use is known, determine if it is hazardous. If the chemical is hazardous, provide employees with the information and training listed above.

MOCA (4,4'-methylene bis (2-chloroaniline))

2/Z 437-002-0364 MOCA (4,4'-methylene bis (2-chloroaniline))

Employees must be trained in the following before entering a MOCA-regulated area:

  • MOCA's carcinogenic hazards
  • Operations involving MOCA
  • The purpose of the medical-surveillance program
  • Decontamination practices
  • Emergency procedures and first aid
  • Conditions that could cause the release of MOCA

Employees must review these requirements at the first training session and annually thereafter.

Thiram

2/Z 437-002-0373 Thiram

Employees exposed to thiram must receive training in safe use and handling that covers:

  • Health hazards of thiram exposure
  • Operations that could result in exposure to thiram
  • The purpose for, proper use of, and limitations of personal protective equipment
  • Thiram's toxic and skin-irritation effects
  • The necessity of effective personal hygiene
  • A review of 437-002-0373 at the employee's first training and annually thereafter
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Periodic training requirements

A summary of Division 3, Construction rules that have periodic training requirements.

Construction safety training and education

3/C 1926.21 Construction safety training and education

Oregon OSHA's responsibilities. Oregon OSHA is required to establish programs that teach construction workers and employers to prevent unsafe workplace conditions.

Employer's responsibilities. Instruct employees to recognize, avoid, and control unsafe conditions in their work environments. Employees handling or using poisons, caustics, and other harmful substances must have instruction that emphasizes hazards, personal hygiene, and personal protective equipment. At job sites where harmful plants or animals are present, employees must be instructed in potential hazards, how to avoid injury, and first-aid procedures.

Employees handling or using flammable materials must be instructed how to do so safely.

All employees who enter confined or enclosed spaces must be instructed about the hazards, precautions, and necessary protective equipment.

Medical services and first aid

3/D 1926.50 Medical services and first aid

If a clinic, hospital, or physician is not reasonably accessible to the worksite, a person trained in first aid must be available on site.

Ionizing radiation

3/D 1926.53 Ionizing radiation

A competent person must perform work involving radioactive materials. Work involving materials used under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license can be done only by NRC licensees or by competent persons under the direction and supervision of the licensee.

Hazard communication

3/D 1926.59 Hazard communication

NOTE: The requirements to construction work under this secton are identical to those in 1910.1200, Hazard Communication (General Industry, Division 2/Z).

Provide employees with training and information on hazardous chemicals in their work areas at the time of their initial assignment and whenever you become aware of new hazards. Training and information must cover:

  • Hazard communication requirements
  • Operations where hazardous chemicals are present
  • The location and availability of the written hazard communication program
  • Methods used to detect the presence or release of hazardous chemicals in the work area
  • Chemical hazards in the work area
  • How employees can protect themselves from chemical hazards, including spills or leaks from sealed containers

Methylenedianiline (MDA)

3/D 1926.60 Methylenedianiline (MDA)

Provide employees with information and training on MDA in accordance with Oregon OSHA's hazard communication training requirements, 1910.1200(h), at the time of initial assignment and at least annually thereafter.

Make all training program materials available to affected employees, including a copy of 1926.60.

Keep training records for one year after an employee's termination date.

Lead

3/D 1926.62 Lead

All employees exposed to lead at or above the action level, or to lead compounds that may cause skin or eye irritation, must participate in annual lead-hazards training covering:

  • The lead requirements (1926.62) for the construction industry and the appendices
  • Operations that could result in exposure to lead above the action level
  • The purpose, proper selection, fitting, and use of respirators
  • The medical surveillance program and the medical removal protection program
  • Engineering controls and work practices
  • Any compliance plan in effect
  • Prohibitions against removing lead with chelating agents without the direction of a licensed physician
  • Employees' right of access to records

Provide all information and training materials to employees upon request.

Occupational noise exposure

3/D 437-003-0027 Occupational noise exposure

You must have an annual training program for employees exposed to noise at or above an eight-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels. You must update the program to reflect changes in personal protective equipment and work processes. You must fit those exposed to noise at or above the 85-decibel limit with hearing protectors and train them how to use and care for them.

Respiratory protection

3/E 1926.103 Respiratory protection

Train employees to use respirators properly. Training must focus on why a respirator is necessary, the importance of proper fit, a respirator's capabilities and limitations, how to use a respirator in emergencies, and how to care for it.

New employees who have had respirator training within 12 months of their hire dates are exempt from training for their first year on the job if they can demonstrate they know how to use and maintain their respirators.

Retraining is required at least annually, sooner if worksite hazards change or if employees switch to another type of respirator. Employees who do not understand how to use or properly care for their respirators also must be retrained.

Any employee who is not required to wear a respirator but asks to wear one must read 1926.103, Appendix D, Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard.

Fire protection

3/F 1926.150 Fire protection

Develop a fire-protection program that will be followed throughout all phases of construction and demolition work and provide firefighting equipment as specified in 1926.150. If warranted by the project, you must also provide a trained and equipped fire brigade.

Power-operated hand tools

3/I 1926.302 Power-operated hand tools

Only workers who have appropriate tool-specific training can operate a powder-actuated hand tool.

Gas welding and cutting

3/J 1926.350 Gas welding and cutting

Instruct employees in the safe use of fuel gas:

  • Before a regulator is connected to a cylinder valve, the valve must be opened slightly and closed immediately. The cylinder valve must always be opened slowly to prevent damage to the regulator. For quick closing, valves on fuel-gas cylinders must not be opened more than 1.5 turns.
  • Fuel gas cannot be used from cylinders through torches or other devices equipped with shutoff valves without first reducing the pressure through a suitable regulator attached to the cylinder valve or manifold.
  • Before a regulator is removed from a cylinder valve, the cylinder valve must be closed and the gas released from the regulator.
  • If the valve on a fuel gas cylinder is opened and there is a leak around the valve stem, the valve must be closed and the gland nut tightened. If this does not stop the leak, discontinue use of the cylinder, put it out of service, and remove it from the work area.
  • If a leak should develop at a fuse plug or other safety device, the cylinder must be removed from the work area.

Arc welding and cutting

3/J 1926.351 Arc welding and cutting

Instruct employees in safe arc welding and cutting practices, including:

  • Remove electrodes from holders when holders are not used and place the holders so they will not contact workers or conducting objects
  • Do not dip hot electrode holders in water
  • Open the power supply switch to the equipment when an arc welder or cutter leaves the work area or when the arc welding or cutting machine is moved
  • Report any faulty or defective equipment to a supervisor

Fire prevention, welding, and cutting

3/J 1926.352 Fire prevention, welding, and cutting

When welding, cutting, or heating work exceeds normal fire-prevention precautions, at least one other employee must watch to ensure that a fire does not start. Firewatchers must be instructed about fire hazards and know how to use firefighting equipment.

Training, scaffolding

3/L 1926.454 Training, scaffolding

Before employees work on a scaffold, they must be trained by a person qualified in the subject matter of the scaffold they will use. They must be able to recognize the hazards associated with the scaffold and know how to control or minimize the hazards.

Training must cover:

  • Electrical hazards, such as overhead power-transmission lines
  • Fall hazards and methods to control them
  • Ways to protect people below from falling objects
  • How to use the scaffold's walkways, platform components, and access areas
  • The scaffold's load capacity and the types of loads appropriate for the scaffold
  • The requirements in Subdivision 3/L that apply to the scaffold
  • Training for erectors and dismantler

In addition to the training required for scaffold users (above), training for erectors and dismantlers must include:

  • Hazards associated with the scaffold being erecting or dismantled
  • Correct procedures for erecting, disassembling, moving, and maintaining the scaffold
  • Design criteria, maximum intended loads, and intended use of the scaffold

Retraining. Employees must be retrained if they lack the skill or knowledge to safely use, erect, or dismantle a scaffold. Other reasons for retraining include worksite changes that create new hazards and changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, or falling-object protection used.

Fall protection

3/M 437-003-0503 Fall protection

Employees who could be exposed to fall hazards must be trained to recognize them and know procedures that minimize them. A competent person who understands the following must do the training:

  • The nature of fall hazards in the work area
  • Procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting fall-protection systems
  • Use of guardrail systems, personal fall-arrest systems, safety-net systems, warning-line systems, safety-monitoring systems, and controlled-access zones
  • The role of each employee in the safety-monitoring system
  • Limitations of mechanical equipment during roofing work on low-sloped roofs
  • Procedures for handling and storing equipment and for erecting overhead protection
  • Employees' roles in fall-protection plans
  • The requirements of Oregon OSHA's fall-protection rules

Certification. Document that employees have been trained; include their names, training dates, and the trainer's signature.

Retraining. Retrain any employee who does not have the skills required in 1926.503.

Wind velocity device, cranes and derricks

3/DD 437-003-0080 Wind velocity device, cranes and derricks

Wind velocity device. Crane operators must be instructed about maximum permissible wind speeds during operation and about the load chart, which has the wind velocity operating limits.

Crane operator safety training requirements

3/CC 437-003-0081 Crane operator safety training requirements

If you have employees who operate cranes or derricks, you must have a written procedure that ensures they safely operate the equipment. Document each employee's training and years of crane-operating experience; include the type of training, training date, and the trainer's name.

Five-ton-capacity cranes, training card. Employees who operate cranes of five-ton (or greater) capacity must have additional training and must possess a valid crane operator's safety training card. The training card must specify the types and sizes of cranes the operator is trained to operate. Other required information includes the card's original issue date, expiration date, operator's name, Social Security number, signature, picture, and the trainer's signature. The card must be renewed and signed every three years by a training institution or by the employer.

Site clearing, pre-construction activities

3/O 1926.604 Site clearing, pre-construction activities

Employees who do pre-construction site clearing must be protected from toxic plants and have instruction in first-aid procedures.

Hoisting and rigging

3/R 1926.753 Hoisting and rigging

All employees engaged in multiple lift rigging must be trained in rigging procedures in accordance with 1926.761(c)(1).

Training, steel erection

3/R 1926.761 Training, steel erection

Fall hazard training. Provide training by a designated qualified person for all employees exposed to fall hazards. Provide additional special training to employees engaged in the following activities:

  • Multiple lift rigging procedure
  • Connector procedures
  • Controlled decking zone procedures

Additional training requirements

3/R 437-003-0761 Additional training requirements

Certification of training. Prepare a written record that includes the name or other identity of the employee trained, the training dates, and the trainer's signature.

Retraining. Employees must be retrained when changes in the workplace or changes in fall-protection systems make previous training obsolete. Employees whose knowledge or use of fall protection systems on the job indicates a lack of training also must be retrained.

Underground construction

3/S 1926.800 Underground construction

Employees must be able to recognize and avoid underground construction hazards. They must have training covering the following topics:

  • Air monitoring
  • Emergency procedures
  • Ventilation
  • Illumination
  • Communications
  • Flood control
  • Mechanical equipment
  • Personal protective equipment
  • Explosives
  • Fire prevention and protection

Shift workers. Shifts coming on duty must be informed of hazardous conditions, including gas leaks, equipment failures, earth or rock slides, floods, fires, or explosions.

Rescue. Rescue-team members must be qualified in rescue procedures, the limitations of breathing apparatus, and firefighting equipment. Qualifications must be reviewed annually. Employees must practice using self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) monthly if they anticipate rescue work at job sites where they could be exposed to flammable or toxic gases. Rescue teams must know about all hazardous conditions at the job site.

Compressed air

3/S 1926.803 Compressed air

Those who work in compressed-air environments must have at least one competent person who is familiar with the requirements in 1926.803 and who understands the hazards of such environments. A licensed physician, experienced with the physical requirements of work in compressed-air environments and the treatment of decompression illness, must be available to offer medical supervision.

Medical lock monitoring. A medical lock must be maintained whenever air pressure in a working chamber is increased above the normal atmosphere, and an attendant must monitor the lock under a physician's control. The attendant must be trained to use the lock and must know how to treat employees showing symptoms of decompression illness.

Blaster qualifications

3/U 1926.901 Blaster qualifications

Blasters must be trained in transporting, storing, handling, and using explosives. They must also know local laws and regulations covering explosives.

Surface transportation of explosives

3/U 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives

Motor vehicles that transport explosives must be equipped with fully charged fire extinguishers and drivers must be trained to use them. Every vehicle transporting Class A or Class B explosives must be attended by a person who knows the class of explosive material and its dangers; that person must be trained to protect the public from the dangers of the explosive material.

Firing the blast

Blasting signal codes must be posted at the worksite and employees must be familiar with them.

Power transmission and distribution

3/V 1926.950 Power transmission and distribution

Employees must be proficient in emergency procedures and first aid. Tree trimmers and linemen doing aerial work must be trained in pole-top rescue. Tree trimmers must also be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Two-worker rules. At least two journeymen or employees with journeyman-equivalent training and experience must work together on energized high-voltage equipment. While in training, a qualified apprentice may replace one of the journeymen.

At least two journeymen or employees having journeyman-equivalent training and experience must also work together whenever contact with energized high voltage is possible, unless guards or barriers protect them.

Stairways and ladders

3/X 1926.1060 Stairways and ladders

Employees must recognize ladder and stairway hazards and know how to minimize the hazards; they must be trained by a competent person and must understand:

  • Fall hazards in the work area
  • Procedures for erecting, maintaining, and disassembling fall-protection systems
  • Proper construction, use, placement, and care of stairways and ladders
  • Maximum intended load-carrying capacities of ladders

Asbestos

3/Z 1926.1101 Asbestos

Annually, train employees who install asbestos-containing products or who do Class I through IV asbestos work.

Class I and II work. Training must be equal to the EPA Model Accreditation Plan. Training must be hands-on and at least eight hours.

Class III work. Training must be equivalent to the EPA Operations and Maintenance Course. Training must be at least 16 hours and include hands-on respiratory protection training.

Class IV work. Training must be equivalent to the EPA Awareness Training Course for maintenance and custodial employees who work in buildings with asbestos-containing material.

Asbestos training must cover the following:

  • Methods of recognizing asbestos
  • Health effects associated with asbestos exposure
  • The relationship between smoking, asbestos, and lung cancer
  • Operations that could result in exposure to asbestos
  • Proper use of respirators
  • Appropriate work practices for asbestos jobs
  • Medical-surveillance program requirements
  • Public health organizations that help employees quit smoking
  • Requirements for posting signs

Access to training materials. Make available to employees written training materials and a copy of 1926.1101.

Training for the competent person. For Class I and II asbestos work, the competent person must be trained in all aspects of asbestos removal and handling. For Class III and IV asbestos work, the competent person must be trained in appropriate asbestos-handling methods.

Training records. Keep training records for one year beyond each employee's last employment date.

Pulmonary function testing. Except for licensed physicians, those who administer pulmonary function testing must complete a training course in spirometry sponsored by an appropriate academic or professional institution.

Chromium (VI)

3/Z 1926.1126 Chromium (VI)

Employees who may be exposed to Chromium (VI) must be able to demonstrate knowledge of:

  • The requirements of 1926.1126
  • The purpose of the medical surveillance program required by 1926.1126

A copy of 1926.1126, must be available at no cost to all affected employees

Cadmium

3/Z 1926.1127 Cadmium

NOTE: The requirement applicable to construction work under these appendices are identical to those in 1910.1027, Cadmium, Appendices A through F (General Industry, Division 2/Z)

Train employees whose work involves potential exposure to cadmium. Annual training is required and must cover:

  • Health hazards associated with cadmium exposure
  • Operations that could result in exposure to cadmium
  • How employees can protect themselves from cadmium exposure
  • The proper use of respirators and protective clothing
  • The purpose of the medical-surveillance program

Certify that employees have been trained; document each trainee's name, the trainer's signature, and the date the training was completed. Keep records for one year.

You must also comply with the training requirements of Oregon OSHA's hazard communication rules.

Methylene chloride

3/Z 1926.1152 Methylene chloride

NOTE: The requirements to construction work under this section are identical to those in 1910.1052, Methylene Chloriode (General Industry, Division 2/Z)

Provide information and training to affected employees before or at the time of their initial assignment to jobs involving exposure to methylene chloride; the information must be presented in a manner that they can understand. Include the training requirements of Oregon OSHA's hazard communication rules, 1910.1200(h). Inform affected employees of the requirements of 1926.1152 and make a copy available to them in the workplace.

Retrain affected employees as necessary to ensure that they understand of the principles of safe use and handling of methylene chloride in the workplace.

When there are changes in the workplace that increase employee exposure above the action level, update the training to ensure that each affected employee has the requisite proficiency.

Ensure that all incidental leaks are repaired and that incidental spills are cleaned promptly by employees using appropriate personal protective equipment and trained in proper cleanup methods.

Cranes and derricks in construction

3/CC 1926.1430 Cranes and derricks in construction

Subdivision CC has specific training requirements for operators, signal people, and competent and qualified people in addition to required training on crane-related hazards.

These employees must understand the training they receive and you must offer refresher training to those who need it. All required training must be provided at no cost to the employee.

Operators. All operators must know the crane manufacturer's emergency stopping procedures (if they are available) and know how to test the boom hoist break. Operators-in-training must go through a pre-certification training period.

Signal people. Before giving any signals, a signal person must be assessed by a qualified evaluator or a third-party evaluator.

Competent people and qualified people. Competent people and qualified people must be trained so that they know their roles and responsibilities.

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Agriculture rules

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Periodic training requirements

A summary of Division 4, Agriculture rules that have periodic training requirements.

General standards

4/A 437-004-0099 General standards

A competent person or people must inspect every place of employment at least quarterly. See 437-004-0251, Safety committees and safety meetings, for related requirements.

Safety orientation for seasonal workers

4/C 437-004-0240 Safety orientation for seasonal workers

For seasonal workers who do hand-labor operations only, you must provide all of the following information:

Safety committees and safety meetings

4/C 437-004-0251 Safety committees and safety meetings

The safety committee must set guidelines for training safety committee members.

Safety committee members must be trained in the purpose and operation of the safety committee, hazard identification, and the principles of accident investigation.

Those who do workplace inspections must be trained in hazard identification.

Those who investigate accidents, work-related illnesses, and fatalities must be trained in the principles of accident investigation.

Noise exposure

4/G 437-004-0630 Noise exposure

All employees exposed at or above the eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 85 decibels must receive initial and annual training. Update the training if there are changes in the hearing protection used or in work processes. The training program must include:

  • The effects of noise on hearing
  • The purpose of hearing protectors; the advantages, disadvantages, and attenuation of various types; and instructions on selection, fitting, use, and care
  • The purpose of the hearing test and an explanation of the test procedures

Respiratory protection

4/I 437-004-1041 Respiratory protection

Train employees to use respirators properly; training must focus on why a respirator is necessary, the importance of proper fit, a respirator's capabilities and limitations, how to use a respirator in emergencies, and how to care for it.

New employees who have had respirator training within 12 months of their hire date are exempt from training for their first year on the job if they can demonstrate they know how to use and maintain their respirators.

Retraining is required at least annually, sooner if worksite hazards change or if employees switch to another type of respirator. Employees who do not understand how to use or properly care for their respirators must also be retrained.

Any employee who is not required to wear a respirator but asks to wear one must read 1910.134, Appendix D, Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard.

The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)

4/J 437-004-1275 The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)

Authorized employees must be able to recognize hazardous energy sources and types of energy in their workplaces and know how to control and isolate the energy. An authorized person is one to whom the employer gives authority and responsibility to perform a specific assignment.

Affected employees must know about the purpose of the energy-control program.

Other employees who may be exposed to hazardous energy must be instructed about energy-control procedures and about the prohibition to restart or energize locked-out or tagged-out equipment.

Medical services and first aid

4/K 437-004-1305 Medical services and first aid

If local emergency medical responders cannot handle injuries or illnesses at your worksite, your emergency medical plan must indicate the names, locations, and phone numbers of trained people who can provide first aid. Ensure that employees understand the plan and their responsibilities under the plan.

Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks

4/N 437-004-1700 Forklifts and other powered industrial trucks

Develop and use a training program for operators of powered industrial trucks. You or an outside training entity can provide the training, which must include:

  • A study and test covering the requirements of 437-004-1700, the information provided by the industrial truck manufacturer, and any other information necessary to operate industrial trucks safely at your workplace.
  • A behind-the-wheel driving test, supervised by a person competent in the operation of the industrial truck and familiar with how the industrial truck will be used.

Only trained employees may operate powered industrial trucks, except those who are under direct supervision as part of the behind-the-wheel training program.

Conduct refresher training at least annually.

Do not consider a new employee trained and qualified based on experience from a previous employer unless the experience includes operating the same type of equipment under similar operating circumstances and the employee has a safe operating record.

Pesticide safety training for workers

4/W 170.130 Pesticide safety training for workers

Workers who perform early-entry activities must be trained before they enter a treated area during a restricted-entry interval to perform early-entry activities.

Other agricultural workers must receive the pesticide safety information presented in 170.130(c) before they enter an area treated with pesticides within the past 30 days.

General pesticide safety information must be presented to workers in a manner they can understand – with printed materials or verbally.

Training materials must include the information presented in 170.130(d)(4).

An employer or trainer who issues an Environmental Protection Agency-approved worker protection standard training certificate must ensure that the worker who receives the certificate has been trained in accordance with the requirements of 170.130(d)(4).

Pesticide safety training for handlers

4/W 170.230 Pesticide safety training for handlers

General pesticide safety information must be presented to handlers in a manner that they can understand – with printed materials or verbally.

The training materials must cover the information presented in 170.230(c)(4).

Lead

4/Z 437-004-9600 Lead

All employees exposed to lead at or above the action level or to lead compounds that may cause skin or eye irritation must participate in an annual lead-hazards training program covering:

  • The requirements of Lead, 1910.1025 and its appendices (work that exposes employees to lead must comply with 1910.1025)
  • Operations that could result in exposure to lead above the action level
  • The purpose, proper selection, fitting, and use of respirators
  • The medical-surveillance program and the medical-removal protection program
  • Engineering controls and work practices
  • Any compliance plan in effect
  • Prohibitions against removing lead with chelating agents without the direction of a licensed physician
  • Employees' right of access to records

Cadmium

4/Z 437-004-9620 Cadmium

Work that exposes employees to cadmium must comply with Cadmium, 1910.1027.

Hazard communication

4/Z 437-004-9800 Hazard communication

Employees must receive information and training on hazardous chemicals in their work areas before they begin their jobs and before they are exposed to new hazards.

Chemical-specific information must be described on labels and in safety data sheets. Employees who mix, load, apply, or handle hazardous chemicals also must receive hazard communication information and training.

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Forest activities rules

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Periodic training requirements

A summary of Division 7, Forest activities rules that have periodic training requirements.

Supervisory responsibilities

7/B 437-007-01110 Supervisory responsibilities

  • Verify that employees have received adequate safety instruction and training and can perform their assigned tasks safely.
  • Require all employees to demonstrate the ability to perform their tasks safely before permitting them to work independently
  • Closely supervise each employee who receives job instruction and training
  • Provide job safety and health instruction and train or discipline employees who work unsafely

Accident investigation

7/B 437-007-0125 Accident investigation

Investigate fatalities and serious injuries, discuss near misses with employees, and inform employees of corrective measures that result from investigations.

Document accident investigations and corrective measures taken; keep the documents for three years.

Training

7/B 437-007-0140 Training

Provide job safety and health training to all employees before their initial work assignments or before they are assigned new tasks, tools, equipment, machines, or vehicles.

Safety and health training must include:

  • Safe work procedures, practices, and requirements
  • Recognition of safety and health hazards associated with each employee's specific work tasks, including measures and work practices to prevent or control hazards
  • Safe use, operation, and maintenance of tools, equipment, machines, and vehicles that each employee uses or operates, including the manufacturer's operating and maintenance instructions, warnings, and precautions
  • A review of Division 7 requirements and hazards associated with your work

Hazard identification

7/C 437-007-0205 Hazard identification

Ensure that hazards are marked with hazard identification ribbon. The ribbon must be bright orange, at least 1.5 inches wide, and marked with black skull and crossbones or the word "Danger." Notify employees of existing marked hazards in their work areas and instruct them so that they recognize the ribbon and know what it means.

Medical services and first aid

7/C 437-007-0220 Medical services and first aid

Develop and implement an emergency medical plan for dealing with on-site emergencies and ensure that employees understand the plan. Those employed in forest activities must be trained in first aid and CPR. All employees must be informed of the location of first-aid supplies.

Respiratory protection when machines are operated

7/D 437-007-0350 Respiratory protection when machines are operated

When you require employees to wear respirators or when forest-activities rules require them, you must provide the respirators, medical evaluations, and respirator training at no cost to employees.

You must train employees about the respiratory hazards to which they are exposed during their work, how to put on and remove respirators, the limitations on respirator use, and how to maintain and store respirators.

Fire extinguishers

7/E 437-007-0410 Fire extinguishers

Portable fire extinguisher use, training, and maintenance must be in accordance with the requirements in Subdivision 2/L, Fire protection.

General machine operator requirements

7/H 437-007-0705 General machine operator requirements

Machines must be started and operated only by authorized personnel. Operators must be instructed in and comply with manufacturer recommendations for machine operation, maintenance, safe work practices, and on-site operating procedures.

Securing machines

7/H 437-007-0725 Securing machines

Have procedures to prevent the release of stored energy, accidental startup, or movement of the machine before the operator leaves the workstation.

Instruct all authorized employees in shutdown procedures. Authorized employees must demonstrate a working knowledge of the specific shutdown procedures they are required to use.

Working near standing tree anchors and tail support trees

7/J 437-007-0927 Working near standing tree anchors and tail support trees

Affected personnel must be notified of the potential failure zone of any tail tree, intermediate support tree, and standing tree anchor. The potential failure zone is the area that could be affected by the failure of any part of a tail tree, intermediate support tree, or standing tree anchor from forces or loads imposed on the tree by guylines, running lines, or skylines.

A competent person must instruct affected personnel in the safe work practices required for work activity in any potential failure zone. Instruction must identify the boundaries of the potential failure zone, potential for the boundaries of the failure zone to change when line pull and line angles change, and limitations or restrictions for entering or working in the potential failure zone.

Wildland fire suppression

7/N 437-007-1325 Wildland fire suppression

In addition to the training requirements of 437-007-0140, Training:

  • Ensure that all personnel who may be called upon to do wildland fire suppression or prescribed fire activities receive basic wildland fire-safety training.
  • Training must be presented by a qualified person, must include instruction and training on the curriculum outlined in Appendix 7-C, and must be presented in a language and manner that the employee can understand.
  • Keep a written record of each employee's basic wildland fire-safety training.
  • Employees who are issued fire shelters must first receive instructions on how to use them from a qualified person, and at least annually thereafter.
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About this publication

How to use this guide

Use this guide to find training requirements that may apply to your workplace. The guide includes most rules that require safety training for employees, a summary of each rule, and a reference to the full text.

Remember: This guide summarizes key parts of our rules - it doesn't replace them. If you need more information, check the rule to be sure you're not overlooking anything.

Who should train your employees?

You can decide who will train your employees. However, trainers must have appropriate technical knowledge, skill, and ability in the subjects they teach. They need to be able to communicate effectively, motivate their students, and apply learning objectives that meet their students' needs.

Why training is important

If you're an employer, you must train your employees in the safety and health aspects of their jobs. This guide can help you determine the training your employees need to do their jobs safely.

Oregon OSHA offers free training workshops that introduce employers and employees to workplace safety and health topics.


Questions or comments? We'd like to hear from you.
Contact our Ellis Brasch, Program Development Specialist

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All divisions (does not include periodic training)

Division 1, General administrative rules

Division 2, General Occupational safety and health

Division 3, Construction

Division 4, Agriculture

Division 7, Forest activities

Summary of Oregon OSHA rules that have periodic training requirements:

Division 2, General occupational safety and health

Division 3, Construction rules

Division 4, Agriculture rules

Division 7, Forest activities rules

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Periodic training

Summary of Oregon OSHA rules that have periodic training requirements:

Division 2, General occupational safety and health

Division 3, Construction rules

Division 4, Agriculture rules

Division 7, Forest activities rules

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